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SOCIAL LINKS

           


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Canada



CANADA

Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Feeling desperate and need someone to talk to? By calling 1-800-273-TALK (8255) you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area, anytime 24/7. You can also visit http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/.

Mental Health Commission of Canada

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) is a catalyst for improving the mental health system and changing the attitudes and behaviours of Canadians around mental health issues. Through its unique mandate from Health Canada, the MHCC brings together leaders and organizations from across the country to accelerate these changes. www.mentalhealthcommission.ca offers collaborative spaces to read, share and discuss important topics related to mental health, as well as guides for accessing the distress centre nearest to you if you are in crisis.

Jack.org

Jack.orgJack.org is a national charity dedicated to supporting student leadership in Canadian mental health promotion and advocacy work. We work with students across the country to increase mental health literacy and to reduce stigma directly in their school communities in ways that are relevant to their diverse realities. Students can get involved in 3 main ways. Through Jack Talks, we teach young speakers to give educational presentations in schools across Canada. In Jack Chapters, groups of students conduct outreach and awareness activities in their schools throughout the year. With Jack Summit, our final program, we bring representatives from our network together in Toronto to collaborate with each other and elevate their work. As an organization, we are not a service provider for youth mental health support. Instead we offer programs and resources to help young people raise their voice and work for safer more supportive communities across Canada.

Kids Help Phone

Kids Help Phone is Canada’s only toll-free, 24-hour, bilingual and anonymous phone counselling, web counselling, and referral service for children and youth. Every day, professional counsellors provide support to young people ages 20 and under across the country. The service is completely anonymous and confidential – Kids Help Phone don’t trace calls, and don’t have call display. You don’t even have to tell them your name if you don’t want to. www.kidshelphone.ca also offers resources on topics including bullying, dating, friendship, and school. Call 1-800-668-6868 for a free, safe, and non-judgmental conversation.

Portico

Portico is an online network where you can connect with others interested in mental health and addiction –  health care providers, people living with mental health and addiction problems, families and caregivers. At https://www.porticonetwork.ca/ you’ll find information, tools, resources, videos and blogs about mental health and addiction, as well as a forum where you can ask questions and share your own expertise and experience.

Visit www.teenmentalhealth.orgwww.mindyourmind.ca, and www.cmha.ca for more Canadian youth mental health resources.

Affordable Colleges Online

What constitutes a normal level of stress? When does sadness cross into depression? Where does someone go for guidance and counseling when these feelings become too much to bear? This guide serves as a resource for college students who need (or think they might need) help. Leveraging the expertise of several mental health and counseling experts, this resource explores the various mental health concerns that today’s college students face and discusses where and how students can find help. These experts bring with them years of on-the-ground professional experience with student mental health issues, along with answers to some of the more pressing questions about anxiety, depression, stress, and other concerns that have become intertwined in the fabric of college life.

Visit http://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/college-student-mental-health/ to access the guidebook.



Why 'Brighter'?

Though we understand the deterioration and devastation marking the course of mental illness for many. We want to emphasise the tremendous scope for recovery when support and treatment are attained, and when they are separated from stigma and taboo. The 'It Gets Brither' wording was chosen deliberately to inspire hope and challenge the perception, common to sufferes of mental illness, that the darkness will go on forever.